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Media Watch

The Overthrow of Morsi, July 2013

Issue No. 42
Monday, 29 July 2013

A Survey of Editorials

By: J R Philemon Chiru
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

Note: After weeks of tension on 3 July 2013, the first popularly elected President of Egypt Mohamed Morsi was overthrown by the military. Since his election on 30 June 2012, his governments’ policies became increasingly unpopular and culminated in the 30 June protest that called for his resignation. Due to increasing violence between pro- and anti- Morsi supporters, the military ousted him after the expiration of a 48-hour ultimatum issued on 1 July 2013 to mend fences with the demonstrators. Editorials from international and Middle Eastern media in the weeks leading up to the 30 June protest, the intervention of the Egyptian military and the ouster of Morsi are reproduced here.  Editor MEI@ND.
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The Saudi Gazette, Jeddah, Editorial, 19 June 2013, Wednesday
1. A Disturbing Opinion Poll
A new poll this week of the opinion Egyptians now have of their hard-won democracy ought to make all the country’s politicians sit up and take notice. In essence popular support  not simply for the government of President Mohamed Morsi but also for the opposition National Salvation Front has, with one exception, fallen significantly with only 28 per cent of respondents trusting the government and 34 per cent having confidence in the opposition. For the full text

The National, Abu Dhabi, Editorial, 20 June 2013, Thursday
2. There’s a Lesson for Morsi in the fall of Mubarak
Storm clouds are gathering over Egypt. Political debate threatens to turn into large-scale street violence, and neither side is showing any interest in compromise. Foes of the president, Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood, have been working for weeks to organize enormous street protests across the country on June 30, the first anniversary of his accession to the post. For the full text

The Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 23 June 2013, Sunday
3. Egypt’s Barren Spring
The fight for a democratic Egypt, that its people waged two years ago, wasn’t just a struggle to get rid of Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year-old dictatorship. It was a fight for better economic opportunities and social mobility. Tired of rampant unemployment and inflation, ordinary Egyptians thronged Tahrir square for weeks, despite facing repression by the state security services, and called for Mubarak to resign. For the full text

The Saudi Gazette, Jeddah, Editorial, 24 June 2013, Monday
4. Egypt: Dialogue is the Way Forward
By repeating his call for dialogue with the opposition, President Mohamed Morsi has shown he is alive to the danger growing political divisions pose to Egypt. In an interview published in the state-owned Akhbar Al-Youm newspaper on Saturday, the president also offered to consider bringing forward parliamentary elections scheduled to take place later this year. For the full text

Gulf News, Dubai, Editorial, 27 June 2013, Thursday
5. Morsi’s Speech Fails to Deliver Reconciliation
Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi looked desperate on Wednesday (26 June) night as he delivered his 160-minute speech, marking the first anniversary of his election as the first elected president in his country’s history. The speech itself was virtually a surreal piece of defensive rhetoric filled with conspiracy theories and unrealistic promises. For the full text

The Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 28 June 2013, Friday
6. Sour Fruits of Spring
A year after Mohamed Morsi became Egypt’s president and became the country’s first democratic leader, Egypt suffered from political uncertainty and economic deterioration. Though he was popularly elected, Morsi’s legitimacy as a leader has been questioned time and again. His attempt to give his office sweeping powers last year was challenged by thousands on the streets and his government has been criticized for its Islamist tilt in policy-making. For the full text

The National, Abu Dhabi, Editorial, 28 June 2013, Friday
7. Demonstrations Will Test Egypt’s Democracy
Mohamed Morsi's first year in office has not been a success. His second year begins Sunday, with what are expected to be large public demonstrations. The protests, and the reasons for them, are measures of the failures of the past year; how violent they prove to be may well serve as a signal for what will come next. For the full text

The Daily Star, Beirut, Editorial, 28 June 2013, Friday
8. Morsi’s Blunders
The election of President Mohammad Morsi was considered a historic development in Egypt last year, and his presidency itself is also becoming historic – as in, a disaster of historic proportions. The embattled and controversial Muslim Brotherhood official took to the airwaves Wednesday (26 June) evening, in what some expected to be an attempt to offer reconciliatory moves to quell the rising level of dissent and opposition to his performance in office. For the full text

The Washington Post, Editorial, 28 June 2013, Friday
9. Seeking Compromise, Not Chaos in Egypt
After a year of misrule by its first democratically elected government, Egypt is hurtling toward a potentially catastrophic political conflict this weekend. It’s a confrontation that is unlikely to benefit either the Islamist government or its mostly secular opposition, but it could destroy Egypt’s hopes for consolidating a stable democracy or addressing its profound economic problems. For the full text

The Independent, London, Editorial, 28 June 2013, Friday
10. Egypt Does Not Need a Second Revolution
As Egyptians steel themselves for a return to the tension and chaos that led to the downfall of Hosni Mubarak, one question above all hangs in the air: does President Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood, with its very particular vision of an Islamist future for the country, have what it takes to govern a nation as old, sophisticated and diverse as Egypt? And if not, what do its opponents, once again crowding into Tahrir Square tomorrow, plan to do about it? For the full text

The Daily Star, Beirut, Editorial, 29 June 2013, Saturday
11. Day of Reckoning
A planned day of protest in Egypt Sunday (30 June) is being likened to a day of reckoning, with good reason. In the simplest possible terms, Egypt is facing a moment of truth for its Jan. 25 revolution, which was supposed to lead the country forward. Instead, after more than a year of rule by President Mohammad Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood, millions of Egyptians have a deep sense of anger and betrayal. As Al-Azhar put it, Egypt is facing the threat of civil war. For the full text

The Peninsula, Doha, Editorial, 29 June 2013, Saturday
12. Egypt in Turmoil
After a year of controversial rule by its first democratically elected government, Egypt is going down the road of instability and chaos. One year is enough for a government to put the basics in place; like policies, peace, and stability. But going by these yardsticks, the government of Mohamed Morsi has failed to instil confidence. It is true that he has been hobbled by powerful forces which are out to make going tough for him, basically a collusion of old regime and secularist forces which though working at cross purposes, are united in their opposition to him. But that is no excuse. With the power in his hands, he should have been able to at least create hope, and establish a modicum of peace and stability. For the full text

The Star, Toronto, Editorial, 29 June 2013, Saturday
13. Egypt’s President Mohammad Morsi should reach out to Critics
Egypt’s young democracy is tearing itself apart. President Mohamed Morsi, marking his first year in office after a free and fair election to replace Hosni Mubarak’s rotten autocracy, has failed to rally a turbulent nation behind his new, Muslim Brotherhood-led government. As a result, Egypt’s Arab Spring high hopes are being cruelly ground into dust. For the full text

The Telegraph, London, Editorial, 29 June 2013, Saturday
14. Egypt: A Revolution on the Brink of Self-Destruction
The talk among Egyptians is of a ‘second revolution’ to finish the business of the first, but the country could lose all it has gained. Hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of Egyptians are expected to take to the streets of Cairo and other major cities on Sunday (30 June) to demand that President Mohamed Morsi, elected exactly one year ago, stand down and make way for some form of transitional government. For the full text

The Saudi Gazette, Jeddah, Editorial, 30 June 2013, Sunday
15. Egypt Holding its Breath
Today is a titanic day in Egypt. June 30 marks the first year of Mohamed Morsi’s presidency and his supporters and opponents are vying to show who’s boss during huge nationwide demonstrations on what could be a fateful day. It is certainly the most serious threat to the nation's tenuous stability since the ousting of former president Hosni Mubarak over two years ago. For the full text

The Jerusalem Post, Editorial, 30 June 2013, Sunday
16. Morsi’s Anniversary
It was no way to celebrate the first anniversary of the inauguration of Egypt’s first democratically elected president. A state of collective anxiety gripped Egypt as hundreds of thousands took to the streets to demand that President Mohamed Morsi step down. For the full text

The Guardian, London, Editorial, 30 June 2013, Sunday
17. Egypt: A Time for Street Wisdom
The tragedy for both sides is that there is a third camp, sitting in the wings, for whom civil disorder is a win-win situation. There is nothing in the revolutionary rule book to say that, two years after toppling a dictator, a country is entitled to enjoy peace. If post-soviet Russia or post-apartheid South Africa have taught the world anything, it is that democratic transitions are frail and fragile creatures, which can be prey for stronger predators. For the full text

The Gulf News, Dubai, Editorial, 1 July 2013, Monday
18. Mohammad Morsi Fails to Heed Calls for Change
More than 17 million Egyptians took to the streets yesterday (30 June) to seek the removal of President Mohammad Morsi. No one disputes that Morsi has a democratic mandate, but Egyptians are bitterly angry that he has grossly misused his time in power to seek short-term advantage for his own political party and did not work for a more long-term and inclusive Egypt. The opposition has invented its own deadline for Morsi to resign in two days and will re-gather in their millions on the streets for a further public trial of strength today, as Morsi gathers his own supporters in what will become a long-drawn clash. For the full text

The Jordan Times, Amman, Editorial, 1 July 2013, Monday
19. The Nation above All
Egyptians demanding the resignation of President Mohamed Morsi have been taking to the streets in several Egyptian cities in growing numbers. Gathering recently in the iconic Tahrir Square in Cairo, over 200,000 people — the biggest demonstration since the 2011 uprising that overthrew Morsi’s predecessor Hosni Mubarak — chanted slogans asking the president to leave and calling for a new presidential election. For the full text

The New York Times, Editorial, 1 July 2013, Monday
20. Military Ultimatum in Egypt
More than two years after Egyptians overthrew an authoritarian, military-backed leader and later installed their first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, the country is facing the possibility of more forcible change — from the military. It is a dangerous moment with no guarantee that another transition will be any more successful than the last. For the full text

The Telegraph, London, Editorial, 1 July 2013, Monday
21. Talk like Egyptians
The warning from Egypt’s military that the country’s politicians have 48 hours to resolve their differences fulfil the worst prophecies of those who voiced scepticism about the Cairo Spring of two years ago. Tahrir Square, the crucible of Egypt’s democratic awakenings, is once again crammed with protesters, many objecting to the outcome of the elections they so deeply craved. For the full text

The Hindustan Times, New Delhi, Editorial, 1 July 2013, Thursday
22. It’s Still Work in the Progress
The first anniversary of Egypt’s first democratically elected government is proving almost as tumultuous and violent as the street protests that brought that democracy about in the first place. The protesters calling for the overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi’s government number between 10 to 15 million, matching if not exceeding the numbers that brought down the dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak nearly three years (2011) ago. For the full text

The Indian Express, New Delhi, Editorial, 1 July 2013, Monday
23. Egyptian Face-Off
There is no alternative to talks. Normalcy in Egypt is crucial for Middle Eastern stability. What was different about the protests across Egypt and the crowds that gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square on the completion of President Mohamed Morsi's first year in office on Sunday (30 June), was the fact that the liberal, leftist and secular opposition groups have finally come together under the grassroots Tamarod (Rebellion) movement. For the full text

Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 2 July 2013, Tuesday
24. Turmoil in Tahrir
The Egyptians are once again thronging Tahrir Square and chanting their discontent. But this time they are not trying to coerce an autocrat to step down from power like they did in 2011, they want to oust a democratically elected president. One year after Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi came to power in Egypt’s first democratic elections, many of his compatriots are eager to see him go. For the full text

The Peninsula, Doha, Editorial, 2 July 2013, Tuesday
25. Egypt in Chaos
The army has stepped in to defuse the crisis in Egypt. In an address to the nation, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the defence minister, issued an ultimatum to President Mohamed Morsi to share power and gave all politicians 48 hours to compromise or have the army impose its own road map. The army’s intervention is not an encouraging sign, but given the enormity of the crisis the country has been going through, there is a need for a power which everybody will listen to. For the full text

The Daily Star, Beirut, Editorial, 2 July 2013, Tuesday
26. Volcano on the Nile
For Egyptian President Mohammad Morsi, perhaps it requires repeating: In early 2011, Egyptians mounted a massive popular uprising in order to remove an authoritarian regime, not to install the Muslim Brotherhood. Perhaps the 48-hour ultimatum delivered by the Egyptian Army Monday will finally provide the wake-up call that Morsi and the Brotherhood need to get the country’s house in order. For the full text

Chicago Tribune, Editorial, 2 July 2013, Tuesday
27. Is Egypt Headed for a Military Coup?
In 2011, Egyptians poured into the streets of Cairo and other cities demanding that the military give up power and make way for a democratic revolution. This week, they came out again — to demand that the first elected president in the nation's long history step down. Oh, and this time they have the military on their side. For the full text

The Independent, London, Editorial, 2 July 2013, Tuesday
28. A Return to Military Rule is No Solution for Egypt
Yet again Egypt teeters on the brink of something worse, perhaps much worse, than its past three years of turmoil. The sight of so many protesters in central Cairo cheering a fly-past of military helicopters, while calling for President Mohamed Morsi’s resignation, will be one of the abiding images of Egypt’s revolution, along with the camel charge in Tahrir Square, the resignation of Hosni Mubarak, and the ousted President being wheeled into his trial on a hospital bed. Each was as disturbing as it was telling. For the full text

The National, Abu Dhabi, Editorial, 2 July 2013, Tuesday
29. Did Morsi Grasp What Egyptians Were Saying
Egyptians have spoken, with a loud clear voice. In their millions, in Cairo, Alexandria and elsewhere, people poured onto the streets on Sunday to denounce the government of Mohamed Morsi, their president for the past year. Now it is up to Mr. Morsi, and his Muslim Brotherhood- sponsored party and its allies, to respond to this roar from the people. How they react will determine which of two futures awaits Egypt. For the full text

The Times of India, New Delhi, Editorial, 2 July 2013, Tuesday
30. President Morsi’s Failure to Provide Democracy and Sound Economics Causes Egypt’s New Turmoil
Egypt's chanting crowds have the same symbolic centre — Tahrir Square — which they had one year ago. But today, demanding President Mohamed Morsi's resignation, the crowds are doing exactly the opposite from when they cheered Morsi's inauguration. Public anger has only grown during Morsi's one-year regime, targeting the President and the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood supporting him, the Brotherhood's headquarters have been stormed and burnt. For the full text

The Statesman, Kolkata, Editorial, 2 July 2013, Tuesday
31. Ferment in Egypt…Again
It is the way history often works. The Egyptian has bared his angst once again. And unmistakable is the element of tragic irony as Cairo’s Tahrir Square hits the headlines once more - two years (2011) after the upheaval against Hosni Mubarak and one year (2012) after the grandstanding that greeted the inauguration of Mohamed Morsi as President, indeed Egypt’s first elected Head of State. For the full text

The Washington Post, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
32. Obama Needs to Support Democracy, Oppose a Coup in Egypt
One of the few things that has been clear about the tumultuous situation in Egypt this week is the plummeting prestige and influence of the United States. Anti-government demonstrators in Cairo’s Tahrir Square have been carrying placards and chanting slogans denouncing the U.S. ambassador; meanwhile senior government officials, anticipating a possible military coup, are already blaming the Obama administration for green-lighting it. For the full text

Chicago Tribune, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
33. Egypt’s Disastrous Coup
Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, a product of the Muslim Brotherhood, acted aggressively to centralize power in his own hands, ignored secular groups with significant popular support and persecuted political opponents. Under his rule, the county's weak economy got worse, while sectarian divisions deepened. By any standard, he has been a rank failure. For the full text

The Saudi Gazette, Jeddah, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
34. A Revolution Being Betrayed
There is currently celebration among the hundreds of thousands of opponents of Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi, who have thronged the streets of Cairo and Alexandria demanding that he stand down. The army has intervened with a warning that Morsi has 48 hours in which to meet the protestors’ demands. For the full text

The Telegraph, London, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
35. The Army Establishes a Fragile Peace in Egypt
When Hosni Mubarak was toppled from power in Egypt in 2011, we cautioned those in the West who were cheering on the revolution that it might unwittingly have unleashed the forces of radical Islam. So it proved. Indeed, the election last year (2012) of a Muslim Brotherhood government should not have come as any great surprise. Mubarak had so dismantled the normal political processes inside Egypt that the only two extant institutions were the army and the Muslim Brotherhood. For the full text

The New Indian Express, Chennai, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
36. An Egyptian Test for Delusion of Democracy
Any hope that Mohamed Morsi’s election as Egypt’s first popularly chosen president in what was deemed a free and fair poll would end the political uncertainty has been belied by the latest upsurge of protests. Had it been a replay of the earlier demonstrations which brought down Hosni Mubarak, there would have been some clarity in the political picture. But, while the numbers of anti-Morsi protesters are high — they claim to have collected 22 million signatures seeking the president’s ouster — Morsi’s supporters, too, have managed to hold fairly large demonstrations in his favour. For the full text

The Daily Mail, Islamabad, Editorial, 3 July 2003, Wednesday
37. Turmoil in Tahrir
The Egyptians are once again thronging Tahrir Square and chanting their discontent. But this time they are not trying to coerce an autocrat to step down from power like they did in 2011, they want to oust a democratically elected president. One year after Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi came to power in Egypt’s first democratic elections, many of his compatriots are eager to see him go. A group called Tamarod (Rebel) has supposedly amassed 22 million signatures in favour of the president stepping down. For the full text

The Daily Times, Lahore, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
38. Morsi in a Fix
Since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and the beginning of a democratic era after 60 years of military or quasi-military dictatorship, Egypt is again plunged into chaos owing to the mistakes of the Muslim Brotherhood led by President Morsi. Now that Morsi has been given 48 hours by the powerful Egyptian military to decide upon a power-sharing formula, which he has rejected for fear that one concession may lead to being forced into many more, Morsi is set to confront not just the protestors in Tahrir Square but also the army. For the full text

Boston Herald, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
39. More Upheaval in Egypt
The promise of democracy in Egypt appears to lie in tatters in Tahrir Square. As protesters opposed to the year-old presidency of Mohamed Morsi occupy the streets and the nation’s military prepares to enforce its deadline for Morsi to step down (today), Egypt’s first freely-elected president last night was vowing to stay and defend his electoral and constitutional legitimacy to the bitter end. For the full text

The New York Times, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
40. Crisis in Egypt
Despite his failings, and there were plenty, President Mohamed Morsi was Egypt’s first democratically elected leader, and his overthrow by the military on Wednesday (3 July) was unquestionably a coup. It would be tragic if Egyptians allowed the 2011 revolution that overthrew the dictator Hosni Mubarak to end with this rejection of democracy. For the full text

Indepedent, Dublin, Editorial, 3 July 2013, Wednesday
41. Egyptians Deserve Better Than another Military Dictatorship
In Tahrir Square in 2011 the world looked on with sympathy and expectation. The sympathy for the massed thousands was based on the simplicity of their demands. Alas, their appeal for bread, freedom, justice and dignity has gone unanswered. For the full text

Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Thursday
42. Battle of Nerves
With widespread resentment brewing among Cairo’s recalcitrant crowds, one wonders where is Egypt exactly heading. Many analysts are saying that the stalemate between the opposition and Mohamed Morsi’s Islamist government will instigate a military takeover. For the full text

The Washington Post, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Thursday
43. U.S. Must Suspend Aid after Egypt’s Coup
THERE IS no ambiguity about what happened in Egypt on Wednesday (3 July): a military coup against a democratically elected government and the wrong response to the country’s problems. The armed forces forcibly removed and arrested President Mohammad Morsi, who won 51 per cent of the vote in a free and fair election little more than a year ago. A constitution ratified by a two-thirds majority in another popular vote last (2012) December was suspended; dozens of leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood have been arrested and a number of media outlets shut down. For the full text

The Jordan Times, Amman, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Thursday
44. Learning the Lessons
Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi was overthrown by the military, which kept this way its promise to intervene if the deadline it gave Morsi to yield to mass protests passes. This by now familiar pattern might have been the easy part in the ever-changing political landscape of Egypt. For the full text

The Jerusalem Post, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Thursday
45. Morsi’s fall
The speed of Mohamed Morsi’s fall, just a year after his dramatic rise to power, underlines the unpredictability of Egyptian politics. For Israel there are both dangers and opportunities in the wake of Morsi’s ouster. The renewed dominance of the military could be a positive development for Israel. It is, after all, the military that monopolizes force and is a stabilizing factor. For the full text

The Gulf News, Dubai, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Tuesday
46. Coming Days Critical for Egypt
Egypt has entered a new phase in its post-January 25 Revolution after the country’s army ousted President Mohammad Morsi and suspended the constitution. The army’s interference and dramatic decision to depose Morsi, on the first anniversary of his election as Egypt’s first elected president, may be problematic. Any time the army gets involved in civil life, people must start worrying. For the full text

The Peninsula, Doha, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Thursday
47. Coup in Egypt
A report said the US was yesterday terribly confused about the latest development in Egypt, being ‘torn between support for protesters and a reluctance to endorse a military coup’. The US dilemma is representative of a general confusion. The events in the country have been so dramatic and quick that its allies in the region and around the world must now wait to see where the country is heading. For the full text

The Star, Toronto, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Sunday
48. Egypt’s Military Coup Casts Shadow over Democratic Revolution
President Mohamed Morsi’s fiercest detractors may be dancing in the streets of Cairo but Egyptians have little cause to celebrate. After a year of chaotic democracy the Arab world’s largest nation is back under military control, its first freely elected president roughly deposed, its Arab Spring gains sadly wasted. For the full text

The Telegraph, London, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Thursday
49. Egypt Must Complete Its Revolution with the Ballot Box
Reflecting on the events in Egypt, William Hague told a reception of the Conservative Middle East Council yesterday (3 July) that “Democratic change is a process, not an event.” History supports his argument. The revolution that overthrew the dictator Hosni Mubarak in 2011 has taken many surprising turns. For the full text

The Independent, London, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Thursday
50. A Backward Step for Egyptian Democracy
So much for democracy in Egypt. Barely a year after the most populous Arab nation’s first free elections, President Mohamed Morsi has been ousted by the military at the behest of the mob. Protesters thronging Tahrir Square – the nerve centre of the revolution that overthrew Hosni Mubarak in 2011 – greeted the news of Mr. Morsi’s departure with similar jubilation. For the full text

The Guardian, London, Editorial, 4 July 2013, Thursday
51. Egypt: Throwing the Ballot Box out the Window
The country has returned to where it was two years ago and with Morsi gone the old regime is back where they want to be. If Egypt's army had wanted to disguise the fact that what they had just done was carry out a military coup, they made a poor job of it. Without mentioning Mohamed Morsi by name, the head of the army General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi effectively declared the removal of Egypt's first democratically elected president by appointed the head of the supreme constitutional court as interim head of state. For the full text

Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
52. People Power in Egypt
There are celebrations going on in Tahrir Square. This time it’s not the resignation of an iron-fisted dictator that has triggered the boisterous merry-making in Cairo — it’s actually the ouster of a democratically elected president. The hapless Mohamed Morsi is out after serving only a year as Egypt’s first democratically elected leader. For the full text

Ha'aretz, Tel Aviv, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
53. Rule of the People
Overthrowing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi required the army to step in, but the army did not initiate his ouster. Rather it was millions of Egyptians, represented by the many demonstrators who took to the streets, who sketched the portrait of the state they want to live in. For the full text

The Saudi Gazette, Jeddah, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
54. Fixing Democracy
Military parades generally take a lot of preparation. Much careful thought must have gone into the manoeuvres of the Egyptian air force fighters as they drew a heart with their vapour trails in the sky above Cairo and then later made low passes over the capital in tight formation. For the full text

Arab News, Jeddah, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
55. ‘Egypt Spring’ Gives Way to Military Chill
The military coup against President Muhammad Morsi has ended Egypt’s first real flirtation with democracy. The man Egyptians chose to lead them away from half a century of military dictatorship, has been ousted by the military machine that he found impossible to tame. For the full text

The Guardian, London, Editorials, 5 July 2013, Friday
56. Egypt: On the Brink of Disaster
It is, to say the least, ironic that the African Union called the coup for what it was and, notably, the European Union did not. Millions of Egyptians took to the streets earlier this week with legitimate complaints about Mohamed Morsi. They accused him of monopolizing power, of assaulting the separation of powers between the presidency and the judiciary, of bearing down on journalists, and ruining the economy. For the full text

The Daily Star, Beirut, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
57. Epic Failure
Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood waited for decades for the opportunity to rule Egypt, and when it got the chance, rigid dogma and disregard for the opinions of others ended up characterizing its disappointing performance. Perhaps few would have expected the dramatic fall of President Mohammad Morsi to play out in the way it has this week, but for many people it was only a matter of time. For the full text

The Indian Express, New Delhi, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
58. Demonstrating This
Tahrir is a reminder that democratic transitions cannot do without the mediating power of institutions. It is being celebrated as the second revolution in the space of just over two years. But any attempt to pass off Egypt's midnight manoeuvre as anything but a coup may not stand the test of scrutiny. For the full text

The National, Abu Dhabi, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
59. Egyptians Can Still Establish Democratic Rule
Just like that, Egypt's first democratically elected president was ousted by the army on Wednesday (3 July), three days after the first anniversary of his rise to power. The military intervention, supported by millions of vocal Egyptians, is soaked in irony: the same people who took to the streets more than a year ago demanding the transition to a civilian state, called on the military to depose Mohamed Morsi. For the full text

The Global Times, Beijing, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
60. Egypt’s Coup Provides a Lesson for Us All
A military coup took place in Egypt Thursday, and democratically elected president Mohamed Morsi was ousted. The Egyptian army has taken on the dominant role in the country's politics once again. Although the army named Adly Mansour, chairman of the Supreme Constitutional Court, as interim president, it is obviously returning to the country's centre of power. The constitution was also suspended. For the full text

Daily Times, Lahore, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
61. The Revolution Resumed?
Egypt’s powerful military finally overthrew President Mohammad Morsi after the latter had defied the 48 hour deadline the army had imposed for a solution to the political crisis that has had the country in its grip since January this year. The overthrown Muslim Brotherhood leader was reportedly being held in a Republican Guards barracks. For the full text

The Hindustan Times, New Delhi, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
62. Arab Spring is not over yet
The election of President Mohamed Morsi to the Egyptian presidency two years ago (2012) was seen as a historic turning point for the Arab world. The people of the largest Arab nation were choosing their own leader for the first time and his presidency was seen as a test case for those who argued that democracy would temper the ideological extremism of Islamist groups like the president's Muslim Brotherhood. For the full text

The Economic Times, New Delhi, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
63. Democracy via Coup? People’s Will is Supreme, not Protocol
The ouster of a democratically elected president in Egypt via a military coup, following widespread popular unrest, raises fundamental questions about democracy itself.  Mohamed Morsi was elected in Egypt's first free and fair elections. Barely a year later, he has been summarily thrown out by the army.  For the full text

The Hindu, Chennai, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
64. Egypt’s Political Abyss
The Egyptian military coup led by General Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, purportedly as a response to days of public protests in which at least 16 people were killed, is an ominous development. The Constitutional Court’s senior-most judge, Adly Mansour, has been sworn in as interim President, but the deposed, democratically elected President, Mohamed Morsi, is under house arrest. According to reports, the interim government is searching for other members of the Muslim Brotherhood — the parent body to Mr. Morsi’s Freedom and Justice Party — apparently to arrest them. For the full text

The Asian Age, New Delhi, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
65. Egypt’s Politics Remains Smoky
After only one year in office, Egypt’s first ever elected President, Mohamed Morsi, was bundled out by the military on Wednesday ( 3 July) in a carefully choreographed move that appeared little different from a coup, whether or not the military busies itself ruling the country directly. The controversial Islamic Constitution framed under the ousted President has been jettisoned. For the full text

The Sydney Morning Herald, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
66. Egyptian Army Acted Too Soon and Without Adequate Cause
When the Egyptian people voted in national elections last year, after a tumultuous series of mass demonstrations which brought down the autocratic regime of President Hosni Mubarak, the people deserved to see the process of democracy respected. Egypt has scant experience of a functioning democracy. It has now seen democracy pushed aside again. For the full text

The Nation, Lahore, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
67. A Challenge to Democracy
The ousted President Mohamed Morsi of Egypt, it seems, moved too fast and too autocratically to introduce changes in the country’s constitution that allowed him to concentrate vast powers in his own hands, thereby raising questions about the democratic credentials of his government, which opponents already doubted. Besides, the hope that his government would lift the sagging economy stood dashed as it went into an almost freefall, and a recourse to the IMF was imminent, creating fears that the financing institution’s patent conditionality of ending the subsidies would hit the poor the hardest. For the full text

China Daily, New York, Editorial, 5 July 2013, Friday
68. Solving the Egyptian Puzzle
The drastic changes in Egypt's political scene have not only fuelled widespread concerns for the fate of Mohamed Morsi, the country's first president elected through a national poll, they have also ignited deep worries that the most populous Arab country may plunge deeper into political crisis and social unrest. For the full text

Boston Herald, Editorial, 6 July 2013, Saturday
69. Egypt in Flames, Again
Whether we call it a coup or call it a revolution, as events unfold in Egypt — dramatically, and now violently — both sides stand to lose. The disaffected Egyptian opposition has risen up in overwhelming numbers to drive out president Mohamed Morsi, Islamist and ally of the Muslim Brotherhood, which they consider a righteous victory. For the full text

The Peninsula, Doha, Editorial, 6 July 2013, Saturday
70. New Challenges
The global reaction to the coup in Egypt was mixed. Though the West and the rest of the world were seen as hostile to Islamic rule in the country under the Muslim Brotherhood, not all of them were happy with the way Mohamed Morsi was ousted and many called it an outright coup. And a coup is a coup whatever the garb it is covered in – friendly or military. The reason for the indignation is that Mohamed Morsi was an elected leader, though he lacked a huge majority. For the full text

Chicago Tribune, Editorial, 6 July 2013, Saturday
71. Don’t Rush to Cut off Add to Egypt
In the unfolding crisis of governance in Egypt, President Barack Obama is in the position of a referee in a tennis match: He has little if any control over the actions of the contenders or the outcome of the contest, but the loser can always blame him. For the full text

The Statesman, Kolkata, Editorial, 6 July 2013, Saturday
72. Cairo Coup
As tanks and troops rumbled into Cairo on Wednesday (3 July), Egypt bore witness to its second upheaval in two years. There are at least three striking features of the drama that led to President Mohammad Morsi’s eclipse in a span of four days. One is the intervention of the military, a legacy of the ancient regime; the other is its support for the protestors; yet another is the people’s rejection of the Muslim Brotherhood, an Islamist outfit that was heading an effete successor dispensation. For the full text

Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 7 July 2013
73. Post-Morsi Violence
Egyptians don’t seem to have a period of respite. Reports of unabated violence and killings in Cairo and elsewhere are quite disturbing. At least 30 people are believed to have died in the clashes that erupted after Friday prayers in and around the historic Tahrir Square in the capital — leaving behind hundreds in a state of limbo. For the full text

The Washington Post, Editorial, 7 July 2013, Sunday
74. Egypt’s Islamist Must Have a Place in a Restored Democracy
Egypt’s military coup has caused some to rush to the conclusion that the tide has turned against Islamist movements in the Middle East. That strikes us as a premature judgment. In Egypt and throughout the Arab world, Islamism surely will be a powerful political force for decades to come. The question is whether its followers will operate — and be allowed to operate — within the bounds of a peaceful democracy. For the full text

The Saudi Gazette, Jeddah, Editorial, 7 July 2013, Sunday
75. Mayhem in Egypt
It was almost inevitable that clashes would ensue between the supporters and opponents of Mohamed Morsi, who was stripped of his presidency by the country’s army less than 48 hours earlier. Fears had been running high over an Islamist backlash to Morsi's removal. Running street battles pitted the Muslim Brotherhood who hotly insist their man was illegally disenfranchised from an office he had won in elections fair and square, and his opponents who are convinced Morsi mismanaged the country so badly during his one year at the helm and was so polarizing a figure that a civil war was bound to erupt had he remained in office. For the full text

The Telegraph, London, Editorial, 8 July 2013, Monday
76. Dangerous Days in Egypt
The prospect that Egypt will descend into all-out civil war following the overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi took a significant step forward yesterday (7 July) after the military was accused of killing 51 protesters, including five women and children, as well as injuring hundreds of others. For the full text

Gulf News, Dubai, Editorial, 8 July 2013, Monday
77. All Sides in Egypt Must Stepped Back From Sustained Violence
Egypt stands on the brink of serious political confrontation as tens of people have been killed every day since the huge marches a week ago. On Sunday (7 July 2013), more than 35 supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood were killed following several incidents from both sides as the supporters and opponents of deposed president Mohammad Morsi clashed with the security forces. It is important that all sides step back from the brink of sustained violence and find a more political way forward. For the full text

The New York Times, Editorial, 8 July 2013, Monday
78. Bloodshed in Egypt
It has been all downhill for Egypt since the military ousted President Mohamed Morsi last week. On Monday (8 July), according to reports in The Times, Egyptian soldiers fired on hundreds of Mr. Morsi’s supporters as they were praying outside the facility where he was believed to be detained. At least 51 civilians were killed and more than 300 were wounded. For the full text

The Daily Star, Beirut, Editorial, 8 July 2013, Monday
79. Too Sides Too Many
If people are interested in following the dramatic developments in Egypt these days, they often turn to television. Some stations have been employing split screens to monitor the gatherings at public squares by supporters of the rival camps, to focus attention on whether group A or group B is amassing a larger number of people at a given hour on a given day. As long as these scenes dominate the media, then Egypt and the Egyptian people are losing. For the full text

The Guardian, London, Editorial, 8 July 2013, Monday
80. Egypt: Disorder, Death and the Generals
In the past 10 days, the security forces became a major instigator of disorder and violence. However the shooting at a Muslim Brotherhood sit-in outside the Republican Guard club in Cairo started – and there are wildly conflicting accounts: the Brotherhood called it "a massacre" shortly after dawn prayers, while the army said it responded to a "terrorist" attack – it is indisputable that 51 people died and more than 300 people were injured in what has become the deadliest single clash since the fall of Hosni Mubarak. For the full text

Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 9 July 2013, Tuesday
81. Killings in Cairo
Egypt sits on the brink of disaster. The post-Morsi demonstrations are taking an unfortunate turn, and the spate of killing simply suggests that unscrupulous elements are out there to foment trouble. A glance at the shootout that took place near the presidential palace on Sunday (7 July), where pro-Morsi supporters were protesting, hints at a deep-rooted conspiracy to plunge the strife-torn country deep into the abyss of polarization and uncertainty. For the full text

The New Indian Express, Chennai, Editorial, 9 July 2013, Tuesday
82. Defend and Support Democracy in Egypt
At least 40 persons are reported to have been killed in Egypt on Monday (8 July) after gunmen opened fire on supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi outside the Republican Guard headquarters where the supporters believe he is being held. As clashes between pro- and anti-Morsi forces escalate, the death toll is mounting and the Egyptian army seems to be waiting for the crisis to worsen and impose martial law. For the full text

The Daily Star, Beirut, Editorial, 9 July 2013, Tuesday
83. Accountability Vital
The news that Egypt’s military will investigate the clashes that took the lives of more than 50 people in Cairo early Monday (8 July) is welcome, but much more is required from the Egyptian army after its recent, forceful intervention on the political scene. For the full text

The National, Abu Dhabi, Editorial, 10 June 2013, Wednesday
84. Egypt Races to Channel Protest Back to Politics
Egypt hangs in the balance. Monday's (8 July) civilian deaths have inflamed tensions so greatly that the phrase "civil war" is starting to be heard. In that context Adly Mansour, the interim president, did the right thing on Monday by setting out a timetable for constitutional change and new elections. Speed is essential if Egypt's discord is to be channelled back into the political sphere before the situation tumbles out of control. For the full text

Al-Ahram, Cairo, Editorial, 10 July 2013, Wednesday
85. Revolution Unprecedented
What is happening now in Egypt is revolution par excellence — one that is unprecedented in this country and the region, if not in the whole world. Have any people, at any moment in time, seen a whole nation take to the streets in their millions? From one end of the country to the other, Egyptians from all their backgrounds, in all their factional, political, social and cultural denominations, took to the streets, and they stayed for four full days. For the full text

The Washington Post, Editorial, 10 July 2013, Wednesday
86. Egypt’s Generals, President Obama Double on Failed Policies
Many Egyptians hoped that last week’s military coup would somehow correct the troubles the country has experienced since 2011 in its transition to democracy. Instead, the generals now in charge are repeating the same abuses and authoritarian practices that preceded the rise to power of the Islamist government they ousted. For the full text

The New York Times, Editorial, 10 July 2013, Wednesday
87. Clouds Darken Over Egypt
The military proved disastrously inept when it tried to govern Egypt after the overthrow of Hosni Mubarak in 2011. Now, a week after ousting Mohamed Morsi, the first freely elected president, the military is orchestrating an even more dangerous manoeuvre. We are deeply fearful that Egypt could devolve into civil war, which would add new trauma to a region already in turmoil. For the full text

The Times of India, New Delhi, Editorial, 10 July 2013, Wednesday
88. Restoration of Democracy and Early Elections are Crucial to Stem Spiralling Violence Egypt
There are ominous signs that the current turmoil in Egypt is set to deteriorate further. A day after (9 July) clashes between supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi and security personnel left at least 51 people dead and more than 400 injured, the Muslim Brotherhood called for an uprising to reverse the week-long developments that have plunged Egypt into a political and constitutional crisis. For the full text

The Independent, London, Editorial, 10 July 2013, Wednesday
89. Hope for Egypt’s Future Hangs by a Thread
There is almost nothing about the present situation in Egypt that bodes well, either in the big picture or in the detail. In Cairo tension remains high following the deaths outside the Presidential Guard barracks on Monday, and any prospect of a government being formed very soon looks remote. For the full text

The Nation, Lahore, Editorial, 11 July 2013, Thursday
90. Egypt’s Dark Hour
Monday’s (8 July) show of force in Cairo by the military junta in order to curb the swelling wave of fury from the pro-Morsi camp, denounced by Muslim Brotherhood as a massacre is a damnable throwback to Mubarak era where repression as a means to encroach on public liberty were the order of the day. For the full text

Gulf News, Dubai, Editorial, 12 July 2013, Friday
91. Egypt cannot be run from the Streets
What Egypt needs now is leaders who can put aside their political differences, overcome real and perceived injustices and work for the good of the whole country. For now, this seems too much to ask. The Muslim Brotherhood has had its president deposed, members killed during protests and its leaders are facing arrest and charges of inciting violence. For the full text

Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 13 July 2013, Saturday
92. Where is Egypt Going?
During Hosni Mubarak’s tenure mass protests were unheard of in Egypt, but since the last two years the country has been intermittently hit by forceful demonstrations. But where is this people power actually taking the Land of the Nile? For the full text

Khaleej Times, Dubai, Editorial, 15 July 2013, Monday
93. Crisscross in Egypt
The stated positions on both sides of the political divide in Egypt are disturbing. The standoff, coupled with violence and defiance, is costing the strife-torn Arab nation dearly.  The army’s decision to probe ousted president Mohamed Morsi for spying, murder and breach of official conduct is likely to complicate the equation, and plunge the country deeper into chaos and uncertainty. For the full text

Compiled by J R Philemon Chiru

J R Philemon Chiru is a Doctoral candidate at the School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Email

As part of its editorial policy, the MEI@ND standardizes spelling and date formats to make the text uniformly accessible and stylistically consistent. The views expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views/positions of the MEI@ND.  Editor, MEI@ND:  P R Kumaraswamy